BlueCross BlueShield just released its Health of America Report showing that concussion diagnoses have increased 43% from 2010-2015. The rise was particularly marked in children and teens with a 71% rise in diagnosed incidences. Not surprisingly the rate in male patients during the fall season was double that of females. “Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts had

In 2001, Teasdale and Engberg published an article in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, entitled Suicide after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Population Study. The researchers reviewed data from Danish hospital admissions covering the years 1979-93 and found that patients who had sustained a TBI had an increased risk of suicide. The authors

Brain tsunamis are seizure-like waves of electrical activity in the brain caused by Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs) and strokes. Much like a tidal wave in the ocean, brain tsunamis build power, wash through the brain, and subside, leaving behind a path of destruction. The waves exhibit electrical signal voltage up to ten times that of normal causing changes to chemistry balance, blood flow, and transfer of oxygen through the brain. During the ebb of the wave, they also cause the brain to short-circuit as evidenced by a period of “dead air” in audio recordings. Doctors have been able to track the process of brain tsunamis for several years but only recently have been able to identify the extent of damage.

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A new study published in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation calls into question whether acute cognitive and physical rest improves concussion recovery times. Thomas A. Buckley, EdD, ATC of the Department Kinesiology and Applied Physiology at the University of Delaware conducted a study to determine if rest after concussion would result in a shorter recovery time in a population of college-aged student-athletes.

This hypothesis was based on the 4th International Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport which recommends rest after injury as “a corner stone for acute concussion treatment” and outcomes. The authors noted that “rest” was achieved by discontinuing “school attendance, academic work, electronics usage and [any] exercise.” Prescribing rest was also believed to reduce the risk of repeated concussion and the “rare, but potentially fatal, second-impact syndrome.”


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Because of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, 15- to 17-percent of our soldiers have experienced a concussion. As a result, the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs have spent large sums of money investigating these injuries and funding research.

This research has been particularly useful in objectively demonstrating that our clients with mild traumatic brain injuries have been injured. However, a question that has arisen from this research is whether there is a difference between “blast” injuries and “blunt” injuries. A blast injury is considered to be any kind of physical trauma that occurs from a direct or indirect exposure to an explosion. On the other hand, a blunt injury is considered to be any kind of physical trauma that occurs by impact, injury or violence—for example, injuries sustained in a car crash.

As a result, this question also raises the issue of whether the scientific research arising from the war can be relied upon in cases that derive from motor vehicle crashes, falls, and other traumatic events.


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For over fifteen years, researchers at the University of Glasgow and the University of Edinburgh have been following a large population of adults admitted to hospital with traumatic brain injuries. Those readers familiar with this blog are familiar with my reporting of the various papers that have been published by these researchers.

I recently came

Despite study after study demonstrating long term effects from mild traumatic brain injury (concussions), it is astounding that defense courtroom doctors still maintain that there are no permanent residuals from mild traumatic brain injury. A new studyImaging Correlates of Memory and Concussion History in Retired National Football League Athletes, published in JAMA Neurology

A new study published in the Annals of Neurology has found that TBI patients’ brains were estimated to be older than their chronological age, “suggesting that TBI accelerates the rate of brain atrophy.”

It is well accepted that with the use of neuro imaging, it is possible to predict age in healthy individuals. The study therefore looked to see what effect, if any, a traumatic brain injury would have on accelerated atrophy of the brain.

The researchers studied 99 patients with persistent neurological problems after traumatic brain injury and compared them with a group of a 113 healthy controls assessed on the same scanner to validate the accuracy of the age prediction model. All of the patients were scanned at least one month post injury with a range of 1 to 563 months. Of the 99 patients, 17% were classified as mild, and 83% being moderate to severe. The cause of injury was included to those injured in motor vehicle accidents, falls, assaults, sport related injuries as well as other causes.


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Neurological testing of the first cranial nerve, which carries the sensory information for the sense of smell, is rarely performed. A new study from the Walter Reed National Military Center provides proof that olfactory testing should be performed.

According to the abstract, the objective of this recent study was to determine whether a structured and