Category Archives: 10 Myths of Brain Injury

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Bruce Stern in Tennessee: All Brain Injury is Serious

Posted in 10 Myths of Brain Injury, Brain Injury Events

On Monday, September 26, 2016, I had the pleasure of giving a presentation entitled “Dispelling the Myths of a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: All Traumatic Brain Injury is Serious.” My presentation addressed 10 myths surrounding Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, such as concussions are not serious, everyone recovers from mild TBI, mild TBI is not permanently disabling,… Continue Reading

Brain Injury Myths

Posted in 10 Myths of Brain Injury, Brain Injury News

In this video, Bruce Stern, Chair of Stark & Stark’s Traumatic Brain Injury Litigation Group, discusses the differences between mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injuries. Mr. Stern also discusses several common myths associated with brain injuries, including the common myth that you must strike your head in order to sustain a traumatic brain injury.

10 Myths of Brain Injuries – Myth 10

Posted in 10 Myths of Brain Injury

This myth has been rejected by the National Institute of Health. In its consensus statement, NIH writes that the consequences of TBI include a dramatic change in the individual’s life course, profound disruption of family, enormous loss of income or earning potential and large expenses over a lifetime.

10 Myths of Brain Injuries – Myth 7

Posted in 10 Myths of Brain Injury

It is not unusual that a neuropsychological evaluation report prepared by a defense neuropsychologist finds a specific patient is faking or suffering from some other problem other than a traumatic brain injury because the neuropsychological findings do no fit “a normal or predictable pattern.”

10 Myths of Brain Injuries – Myth 6

Posted in 10 Myths of Brain Injury

Because standard and traditional neuroimaging such as MRI, CT scans, and EEGs normally are neither specific nor sensitive enough to detect the damage done to the axons and neurons of the brain, the only objective testing which may be sensitive enough to detect and diagnose mild traumatic brain injury is neuropsychological testing.

10 Myths of Brain Injuries – Myth 5

Posted in 10 Myths of Brain Injury

James Smith was stopped at a red light when his car was struck in the rear. At the scene, he was dazed and told the rescue squad personnel that he had pain in the back of his neck. He was taken to the local emergency room where again he complained of neck pain. He was examined, evaluated and released a couple hours later.

10 Myths of Brain Injuries – Myth 4

Posted in 10 Myths of Brain Injury

Another misconception is that if a person has sustained or suffered a traumatic brain injury, today’s sophisticated diagnostic tests will detect it. There is a belief that if those tests are negative or normal, no brain injury has been sustained. Unfortunately, this is another myth.