TBI Injuries on Construction Sites

Posted in Brain Injury News

The construction industry has the greatest number of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) among U.S. workplaces, according to a recent study conducted by researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

The American Journal of Preventive Medicine (AJPM) reports that the data show that 2210 occupational TBI deaths occurred between 2003 and 2010. Continue Reading

Connecticut Court Upholds Admissibility of DTI

Posted in Brain Injury Legal Cases, Brain Injury News

A Connecticut trial court has upheld the use of diffusion tensor imagining (DTI), denying the defendants’ in limine motion to bar its introduction. In Vizzo v. Fairfield Bedfort, LLC, plaintiff retained Randall Benson, M.D.,  a behavioral neurologist, to conduct a behavioral neurological evaluation, to administer and interpret a DTI of the plaintiff and correlate  it with clinical findings.

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New Equation for Evaluating Concussion Tests Harder for Athletes to Fool

Posted in Brain Injuries in Sports

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln released a study involving a new equation used to evaluate post-concussion injuries among high school athletes and its corresponding impact on concussion research.

The Nebraska study outlines a new approach for identifying more athletes who play “impaired” on the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing, or ImPACT. That computerized tool consists of eight subtests that gauge neurocognitive performance. Using the new equation to combine the multiple subtest scores into one evaluative score could make it more difficult for the athlete to “fool” evaluators by providing minimal effort or “sandbagging,” says the recent study.

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New Study finds Emergency Room Physicians Often Fail to Diagnose TBI

Posted in About Brain Injuries

The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation recently published an article entitled “Emergency Department Evaluation of Traumatic Brain Injuries in The United States, 2009-2010.” The article examined emergency department records from the national hospital ambulatory medical care survey in 2009 and 2010 where traumatic brain injury was evaluated and diagnosed either clinically or with head computed tomographic (CT) scans. A CT scan was performed on 82% of the TBI evaluations. Of those, only 9% had CT evidence of traumatic abnormalities.

The authors concluded the emergency department is the “primary gateway” to the medical system for patients with acute TBIs. However, emergency department evaluations have not been sufficiently described. This national study fills an important void.

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Study Finds Long Term Effect of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Children Seven Years Post Injury

Posted in About Brain Injuries, Brain Injury News

At the annual meeting of the Association of Academic Physiatrists, Brad Kurowski, MD, MS, a physician in the division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Cincinnati Children’ Hospital presented his research on the long term effects of TBI among children.

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What Happens When the Brain is Concussed?

Posted in About Brain Injuries, Brain Injuries in Sports

Have you ever wondered what happens within a person’s skull when he/she suffers a traumatic brain injury?

The New York Times recently published a wonderful interactive article about brain injuries. The article describes and demonstrates what happens within a football player’s skull when he suffers a concussion.

Using a mouth guard developed by bioengineer David Camarillo and his team the KAM lab at Stanford, the information gained from the mouth guard and its sensors enabled the researchers to recreate what happens to a player’s brain in a millisecond from the collision.

Included in the article is an interactive representation of what happens to one’s brain.

Click here to read the full New York Times article.

The North American Brain Injury Society enters into formal affiliation agreement with the International Brain Injury Association

Posted in Brain Injury News

It is our pleasure to share with you that after extensive due diligence and thoughtful consideration, the boards of the North American Brain Injury Society (NABIS) and the International Brain Injury Association (IBIA), have voted unanimously to approve a formal affiliation agreement under which NABIS will join IBIA as a special section. This agreement, drafted by Jeffrey Leiter, the long-time outside counsel for both organizations, will allow NABIS and IBIA to deliver significantly enhanced membership benefits to the brain injury professionals that make up both groups. Members of NABIS and IBIA will now have access to a comprehensive set of benefits that combines the strengths of both organizations, providing a more valuable membership experience and the opportunity to be part of a larger and more influential alliance.

Specifically, the full suite of membership benefits now includes: Continue Reading

Robotic Movement Tests May Predict Post-Concussion Syndrome

Posted in Brain Injury News

Brain concussions and the potential for long lasting effects of a mild brain injury are not always obvious to healthcare providers at the time of injury. But recent advances are being made to create tools and tests to assess the potential for long term post-concussion symptoms (PCS) in patients. This is particularly important because recent studies have shown that even mild traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can cause long term healthcare problems.

A recently published study at the University of Cincinnati involved the use of robotic tests to evaluate the risk of long term healthcare problems in  ER patients with concussion symptoms. The tests (KINARM Standard Tests) tracked specific body movements and behavior, e.g., evaluating a patient’s “position sense” in relationship to arm movement. The study outcomes showed that the robotic tests, created by BKIN Technologies Ltd. in Canada, were able to “discriminate between subjects who developed post-concussion syndrome and those who did not.” It was evident in performance data that patients with poor results in “visuomotor and proprioceptive” were more likely to suffer from post-concussion syndrome. The short videos below demonstrate how test results differ between a healthy patient and one who has suffered a brain injury.

Currently the KINARM Labs are only available in research, but if additional studies support the results, robotic movement and behavioral tools may soon become available in emergency rooms to help predict long term outcomes for patients with mild traumatic brain injuries.

If you or someone in your family has had a concussive episode or other type of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), you should consult an experienced attorney to assess your eligibility for financial assistance from medical or other insurance carriers. Consultations are usually free and services are often offered on a contingency basis.

Petty Officer Awarded $2 Million by Burlington County Jury

Posted in Brain Injury Legal Cases, Brain Injury Legislation, Brain Injury News

On August 10, 2011, United States Navel Petty Officer KY, age 26, was stopped in traffic on Route 206 in Bordentown, New Jersey, when her vehicle was rear-ended by a Ford 350 pickup operated by Mr. Avisai Pantle-Aguirre and owned by H&H Landscape Management, LLC. The force of the crash spun KY’s vehicle, causing it to collide with the vehicle stopped in front of her.

KY was initially diagnosed with having sustained a concussion and a neck injury. MRI’s of her brain, neck and low back revealed two small lesions in her left parietal lobe, three herniated discs in her neck and a bulging disc in her low back. Continue Reading