Kids, Sports, and Concussions

Posted in Brain Injuries in Sports

Concussions among children playing sports are not a new phenomenon. In the decade leading up to 2009, an estimated 173,285 children and adolescents 19 and younger were treated during emergency department visits for sports and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). That represented a 62 percent increase in a decade. It is estimated that sports and recreational activities result in approximately 21 percent of TBIs among children in the U.S.

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VA Study to Follow Mild TBI Patients for Decades

Posted in Brain Injury News

According to the Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium (CENC), nearly 20 percent of the 2.5 million service members and veterans who deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan sustained at least one mild traumatic brain injury (mild TBI).

A U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs/Department of Defense study aims to track mild TBI (mTBI) over a decades-long period. The federally-funded study is enrolling service members and veterans who fought in Iraq or Afghanistan. Researchers hope to follow participants for 20 years or more to better understand the long-term neurologic effects of mild TBI and other deployment-related conditions.

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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Cognitive Impairment

Posted in About Brain Injuries

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), commonly known as concussion, is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. Along with impaired cognitive function, mTBI causes an array of symptoms, including headaches, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and irritability, referred to as post-concussion syndrome (PCS). The time it takes for symptoms to resolve in the majority of individuals is thought to be approximately three months; however, some individuals continue to experience symptoms beyond that time period. Those with persistent symptoms are said to experience persistent post-concussion syndrome.

A widely cited figure suggests that only 15 percent of individuals experiencing a first-time concussion will go on to experience long-term cognitive impairment. A recently published research article suggests that this number is likely a gross underestimation.

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Overcoming TBI – A Documentary

Posted in About Brain Injuries

Traumatic Brain Injury (“TBI”) can happen to anyone at any time. The Centers for Disease and Control Prevention (“CDC”) reports that an estimated 1.7 million people sustain TBI annually in the United States. Of those people sustaining TBI, 52,000 die and 275,000 are hospitalized. Nearly 80 percent of those injured (1.365 million people) are treated and released from an emergency department.

The documentary “OVERCOMING” exposes how individuals cope with the consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury. Such consequences differ from person to person and due to the nature of TBI. Also, each person copes with the consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury in ways that differ for each individual. The goal of the documentary is to raise awareness of TBI and to provide information about its consequences.

The director/producer of the documentary, Katerina Dejkoska, is a filmmaker who was motivated by the lack of information and public awareness to explore the topic of Traumatic Brain Injury. The documentary focuses on moving on with positivity after sustaining TBI.

Growth Hormone Deficiency Following Complicated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Posted in About Brain Injuries, Brain Injury News

Traumatic brain injury (“TBI”) is considered the main cause of hypopituitarism in adults and growth hormone (“GH”) deficiency is the most common pituitary deficit associated with TBI.

According to Cedars-Sinai, even after we stop growing, adults need growth hormone. Growth hormone plays a role in healthy muscle, how our bodies collect fat (especially around the stomach area), the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins in cholesterol levels, and bone density. In addition, growth hormone is needed for normal brain function.

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TBI Injuries on Construction Sites

Posted in Brain Injury News

The construction industry has the greatest number of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) among U.S. workplaces, according to a recent study conducted by researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

The American Journal of Preventive Medicine (AJPM) reports that the data show that 2210 occupational TBI deaths occurred between 2003 and 2010. Continue Reading

Connecticut Court Upholds Admissibility of DTI

Posted in Brain Injury Legal Cases, Brain Injury News

A Connecticut trial court has upheld the use of diffusion tensor imagining (DTI), denying the defendants’ in limine motion to bar its introduction. In Vizzo v. Fairfield Bedfort, LLC, plaintiff retained Randall Benson, M.D.,  a behavioral neurologist, to conduct a behavioral neurological evaluation, to administer and interpret a DTI of the plaintiff and correlate  it with clinical findings.

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New Equation for Evaluating Concussion Tests Harder for Athletes to Fool

Posted in Brain Injuries in Sports

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln released a study involving a new equation used to evaluate post-concussion injuries among high school athletes and its corresponding impact on concussion research.

The Nebraska study outlines a new approach for identifying more athletes who play “impaired” on the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing, or ImPACT. That computerized tool consists of eight subtests that gauge neurocognitive performance. Using the new equation to combine the multiple subtest scores into one evaluative score could make it more difficult for the athlete to “fool” evaluators by providing minimal effort or “sandbagging,” says the recent study.

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New Study finds Emergency Room Physicians Often Fail to Diagnose TBI

Posted in About Brain Injuries

The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation recently published an article entitled “Emergency Department Evaluation of Traumatic Brain Injuries in The United States, 2009-2010.” The article examined emergency department records from the national hospital ambulatory medical care survey in 2009 and 2010 where traumatic brain injury was evaluated and diagnosed either clinically or with head computed tomographic (CT) scans. A CT scan was performed on 82% of the TBI evaluations. Of those, only 9% had CT evidence of traumatic abnormalities.

The authors concluded the emergency department is the “primary gateway” to the medical system for patients with acute TBIs. However, emergency department evaluations have not been sufficiently described. This national study fills an important void.

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Study Finds Long Term Effect of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Children Seven Years Post Injury

Posted in About Brain Injuries, Brain Injury News

At the annual meeting of the Association of Academic Physiatrists, Brad Kurowski, MD, MS, a physician in the division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Cincinnati Children’ Hospital presented his research on the long term effects of TBI among children.

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